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DIY Succulent Terrarium

 
by Kim Merrikin, Seattle Goodwill
June 7, 2017
 

Goodwill DIY: Succulent TerrariumConfession: I love the current terrarium trend—but they can be so expensive! So a terrarium—with low-maintenance succulents—seemed like a good foray into adding some summer vibes to my home.

To start, I did a bit of research into the layers of a proper terrarium—and then headed out to our Shoreline store. One of the reasons I head to Goodwill Shoreline for many DIY projects is its proximity to the other stores I’ll need to stop at for DIY supplies—like Home Depot, and a couple different craft stores. (Fun Fact: Home Depot is also one of Seattle Goodwill’s employer partners—they hire students who have gone through our job training & education programs.)

Terrarium Layers

To make the terrarium, I used these supplies:

  • Large river stones (Hobby Lobby)
  • Small river stones (Found at Goodwill, but originally from Hobby Lobby)
  • Succulent Potting Dirt (Home Depot)
  • Succulents (Hope Depot)
  • Glass jar/container (Goodwill)
  • Clay Pot for décor (Goodwill)
  • Sheet Moss (Home Depot)

Assembling the terrarium is quick and easy, and all about layering your materials in the correct order to ensure drainage.

Start with a layer of the large river stones, followed by a layer of the small ones. In total, this should take up about 1/3 of the depth of your container.

Next, add a small layer of dirt, and arrange your succulents in it—adding more dirt to make it level if necessary.

Once your plants are in, add an accent item or two, and fill in some of the area between your plants and décor with a little bit of sheet moss.

Be sure to place your terrarium in a place that has a lot of natural light!

DIY Succulent TerrariumAre you doing DIY projects with your #GoodwillFinds this summer? Tag @SeattleGoodwill and #GoodwillDIY—we’d love to see them!

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Adopt a pet at Goodwill this summer!

 
by Kim Merrikin, Seattle Goodwill
June 5, 2017
 

Seattle Humane MaxMobile is coming to GoodwillYou can find toys, food and water dishes, leashes, and plenty of other pet accessories at any of our twenty-four stores—and this summer at some of our locations, you can find a pet, too! We’re partnering with Seattle Humane to host their MaxMobile so you can adopt a new best friend.

Check out Seattle Humane’s website to get any details you need to be prepared to adopt on-the-spot, and make plans to swing by one of the pet adoption events this summer:

Adopt a pet! Goodwill will be hosting Seattle Humane's MaxMobile

Goodwill Juanita
Saturday, June 10, 11:00 am – 2:00 pm

Goodwill Seattle – Flagship
Friday, July 28, 3:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Goodwill Shoreline
Friday, August 25, 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm

If you adopt a new furry friend on one of these days, we’d love to see it! Share it with us by tagging @SeattleGoodwill and #MaxMobile on your favorite social media channel!  

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DIY Mini Herb Garden

 
by Kim Merrikin, Seattle Goodwill
June 2, 2017
 

Goodwill DIY: Mini Herb GardenWith grilling weather officially here—and plenty of sunshine and daylight for evening barbeques and picnics, I wanted to put together a mini herb garden so I can freshen up my summer dishes a bit and also add a little indoor foliage to my dining area.

With a little browsing through Pinterest, I decided making my herb garden in glass jars—with some sort of container to keep them all together—beyond that, I didn’t have much vision for this project. Over the years of #GoodwillDIY-ing, I’ve learned to approach projects with flexibility. You never know what you’re going to find at Goodwill!

For this project, I shopped at our store in Shoreline—and found everything I needed in one stop! I found some canning jars in a bright blue color, a basket that fit them perfectly, and some unopened “river stones”—which are a common craft store find, so it was easy to find matching rocks for our next DIY project. (Coming soon to the blog: DIY Succulent Terrarium)

Goodwill DIY: Goodwill Items for a herb gardenHere’s the full list of materials I used for this project:

  • 4 small jars (Goodwill)
  • A small basket (Goodwill)
  • Acrylic paint (Already had in my craft supplies – but easily found at Goodwill!)
  • Potting soil (Home Depot)
  • 3 Herb Plants: Thai Basil, Rosemary, Thyme (Home Depot)
  • River Stones (Goodwill)

Goodwill DIY: Herb Garden SuppliesI started with removing the lid from my basket, and painting the inside. Once the inside was dry enough to touch, I painted the outside.

For the planting, I put about 1.5” of the stones in the bottom of each jar—this will help with drainage when you water the plants, since the jars don’t allow water to run out.

Next, I added a layer of potting dirt, and added the plants themselves to the jars—covering any remaining area with a little more dirt. Because the thyme plant I bought was so full, I divided it into two separate jars—plus, who wouldn’t want a little extra thyme on their hands?!

Once my painted basket was dry, I set the jars into the basket—and voila! A tiny herb garden that met my spatial needs—and added a little color and flavor to my summer.

Are you doing DIY projects with your #GoodwillFinds this summer? Tag @SeattleGoodwill and #GoodwillDIY—we’d love to see them!

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Check out what's #AtGoodwillNow

 
by Andrew Lang, Seattle Goodwill
April 24, 2017
 

With 40 donation centers scattered across the Puget Sound, Seattle Goodwill receives countless unique, highly sought after items that land on our store shelves and are quickly purchased or rotated out on a routine basis.

In fact, we get so much, keeping tabs on the most intriguing donations is quite challenging. And once a desirable item hits the sales floor, blink a few times and it’s gone.

Well, thanks to our Spring Shop Campaign, we are reducing customers’ fear of missing out.

Seattle Goodwill’s social media channels have always showcased the many items we receive, and we are excited to announce the addition of two new Twitter accounts—one for Capitol Hill (@ShopCapHillGW) and one for our South Everett (@ShopSEverettGW) location—where new donations will be posted on a daily basis in real time.

Throughout the day items will be tweeted out as they arrive on shelves followed by #AtGoodwillNow. Every trip to our stores offers a treasure hunt, and we encourage customers to use the hashtag to share those gems with other Goodwill shoppers. Helping others find items of interest ultimately benefits our free job training and education programs.

While a hyperlocal focus is being placed on Capitol Hill and South Everett, there is a possibility in the future of expanding twitter accounts to showcase all our stores.

Be sure to follow our new accounts and regularly check their feeds to make sure you aren’t missing out on the latest hidden treasures.

FOLLOW OUR NEW TWITTER ACCOUNTS

Capitol Hill: @ShopCapHillGW

South Everett: @ShopSEverettGW

Don’t forget to use #AtGoodwillNow with your tweets and tag us at @SeatteGoodwill.

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An alternative to buying new or renting expensive winter sports gear

 
by Bennett Tiglao, Seattle Goodwill
February 17, 2017
 

With plenty of snow falling in the mountains across the northwest, this winter season has been terrific for winter sports and activities. Unfortunately, one of the main road blocks between a day on the slopes and a day on the couch is affordability. First time buyers of skiing and snowboarding equipment know just how expensive gear can be, not to mention the cost of rentals, gas to get to the mountain and lift tickets.

However, there are less expensive options that offer outdoor enthusiasts the chance to get up to the mountains more frequently without the large price tag attached. Seattle Goodwill has a wide variety of winter sports gear at shopgoodwill.com and our eBay store. And every purchase made helps create jobs for those in need by providing support for our free Job Training and Education (JTE) Programs.

Timing is everything if you’re looking to hit the slopes and save costs. Here are a couple tips on when to go:

  1. If you have the flexibility in scheduling your vacation or your day trip to the resorts, opting to ski early or late in the season will cost far less than skiing during peak season.
  2. Keep in mind the highest demand times. Riding during the day, weekends, holidays and spring break will be the most expensive.
  3. Riding in the evenings, during weekdays and avoiding holidays are the best times for lower ticket prices. You will also avoid big lift lines.

Seattle Goodwill has a wide array of winter sports gear. Below is a checklist of what you’ll need in order to hit the slopes.

  • Snowboard with bindings or skis with bindings
  • Boots
  • Goggles
  • Head gear
    • Beanie/Hat
    • Helmet
  • Winter Jacket & Pants
  • Gloves

Snowboarding vs skiing

If you’re thinking about trying snowboarding or skiing for the first time and can’t decide which to try, here are some of the differences to consider:

  • Snowboarders constantly have to sit or exert energy to remain on edge while they are stationary. Unlike skiing, you will not have poles to help you remain upright and standing when you are not moving.
  • Snowboarding is a lot easier on the knees compared to skiing. Knee injuries are not as common in snowboarding as they are in skiing. Snowboarding can, however, be a lot more challenging on your wrists so make sure you wear some wrist guards.
  • Snowboards work nicely in powder while skis are better in bumps and ice.
  • Getting up after a fall on a snowboard is a skill in itself but once mastered should prove to be easier and faster than having to put your stuff together again after falling on skis.
  • Chair lifts can be a little more difficult for snowboarders.
  • Skiing is easier for most people to learn, but harder to master, while snowboarding tends to be harder to learn, but once learned, easier to advance.
  • Skis can be kept on the entire time while on slopes. Snowboarders need to un-strap/re-strap one foot each run.

 

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